May Day

Recorded and Knit together by WSM
Lilly of the Valley

“What was the first foreign country you visited?” asks my computer as I enter yet another protected website. “France” I type in and think back on that first visit, when spring and love were beginning, and April in Paris was not just a song. Wearing an oatmeal-colored Jaeger suit of a little box jacket and the skirt that just touched my knees, I nervously boarded an AirFrance plane at London Heathrow Airport. Looking back I realize that the elegant gentleman sitting beside me was remaining extremely courteous as he escorted me through the departure gate – though he quickly faded away when he saw a very lean young man in pinstriped jeans and a cocky hat hiding by a pillar, watching and waiting for me. It was spring of 1964 and I had just turned 21 years old, about to enjoy two weeks of spring-time in Paris and the acceptance of what has turned out to be a very long love affair. 

Though the love affair endures, the spring-time weather has spun out of control and this May Day weekend the wind whipped cherry blossoms off the trees with a cruel beating. It is difficult to see how any bee can make it to the blossoms and scatter their fruit-inducing pollen. A friend tells me that in France on May Day people give bouquets of Lilly of the Valley to their friends and family. They are tokens of appreciation and to bring happiness and good luck. The Lilly of the Valley bulbs I planted last autumn are sadly slow and shy. The leaves are only now just unfolding above the ground.

The May Day bank holiday pays tribute to workers and unions across the world and May 1st is known as International Workers’ Day. Not that at the moment the banks in Britain need a holiday. Most High Street branches have taken the COVID crisis as a time to comb through low lying employees, cutting their on-site staff and reducing their always short counter hours to four a day. There is no union help for the bank staff on this Bank Holiday.

MayDay has another meaning. The “Mayday Mayday Mayday” call of distress from a plane or a ship originated over a hundred years ago in the 1920s. Frederick Stanley Mockford was a radio officer at London’s Croydon Airport. He was asked to think of a word that would indicate distress and be easily understood by all pilots and ground staff during an emergency. In those days much of the traffic at the Croydon airport was to and from Le Bourget Airport in Paris. Mockford came up with “Mayday” derived from the French word “m’aider” that means “help me” a shortened form of “venez m’aider”, “come and help me”.

Now there are different reasons to call out MayDay, as talks are discretely held and whispered through the corridors of power in the capitals of Britian, Iran, and the United States.

Nazanin Zaghari-Radcliffe is not the only dual national citizen held in prison in Iran, but here in Britain her case is the most visible. Finishing one five-year term in prison she is now staying at her parents’ home in Tehran waiting for release or a return to prison. Having completed her sentence for alleged spying she has been rearrested on fresh false charges. If she loses her appeal against this new conviction, she will face another year in jail and a further 12 months in which she is not allowed to leave the country.

Foreign Minister Dominic Raab has finally spoken out saying  “It is difficult to argue against the suggestion that Nazanin is being held ‘state hostage’ and her treatment amounts to torture.” For the first time Raab said her fate was now tied not just to a £400 million debt that the UK government owes to Iran but also the outcome of talks in Vienna on the future of the 2015 Iranian nuclear deal. “We’ve said that the debt is something we want to have resolved,” Nazanin remains the pawn in this chess game of flesh and coin. America is, naturally, also mixed up in this discussion. There is the little matter of four Americans, and the release of $7 billon of Iranian assets held in foreign bank accounts since 1979, and which sanctions the US is prepared to lift in return for Iran coming back into full compliance with the nuclear deal. International talks in Vienna will end at the beginning of June, not very far away, and by then the Iranian presidential election campaign will have begun.

Pay the Debt. Is it really too much to ask? Britain, like other imperialistic powers tries to wiggle out of debts owned, using whatever is at their disposal, wether it be a mere £ 400 million to Iran or £58,000 for refurbishing a ministerial apartment.

Then there is the guilt, or not, of leaving a lover from whom you have used all they have to give as we watch the continents of India, Africa and South America burn up with the hot rasp of breath from the parched dry lungs of their people who go without oxygen. 

What tidbits can be tossed our way to distract us from these global tragedies? From May 17th the UK government has given us unlimited mourners at funerals, moving the stored bodies along from over-filled mortuaries. For weddings there remains a limit of 30 people until June, while crowds and their cash, later to count the cost, are already returning to select outdoor football matches, indoor snooker tournaments, and concerts around the country.

This has been a Letter from A. Broad. 

Written and read for you by Muriel Murch 

First aired on Swimming Upstream – KWMR.org

Web support by murchstudio.com

5 thoughts on “May Day

  1. Ahh Aggie ,

    What a lovely post❣️ Also lovely as my mother’s wedding bouquet was one with lilies of the valley flowers, which as a child deeply impressed me😊❣️ I could imagine smelling them looking at her wedding pictures❣️ It sure helps to be gifted with a rich imagination , still helpful!

    Hope you and Walter are doing well and enjoy this spring. The heavy winds which blew off the blossoms if the English trees, so familiar in my home country! Pfff.

    Hope Beatrice enjoys living in the Low Country. She is quite a girl❣️❣️❣️

    The Dutch seem to practice politics above science , which have driven me insane the last year. (I have to be very cautious in my conversations with my sisters). And think their vaccination program has been appalling! Such a smart country! It’s unconscionable to think they are not all vaccinated yet!

    Yesterday the last of our grandchildren , 17 had her Pfizer shot after she passed her driver’s license. There are somethings which do work here.

    We are in fine fiddle, as we are vaccinated and feel our lives are freer to see the kids some time. Only Nienke we see quite regularly , still trying to get her -to Covid restrictions- green card. And getting her second MBA on her student visa. Amazing , learning a lot about staying in the moment, as she does as well. And, is relatively wise and calm.

    Aggie, Keep on posting your marvelous posts, you are gifted with quite a gift! Sending both of you my love, Anneke❤️😊🌾

    Sent from my iPhone

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    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow Aggie: Did you and Walter really meet when you were 21 and so young in Paris? That’s amazing. Love Lily of the Valley so delighted in reading about that French tradition. ~Elisabeth

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    Liked by 1 person

  3. Yes, I miss my May day Lily of the Valley bouquet. There is a hidden patch in the front yard of our building and I am suppressing evil thoughts of plucking some under the cover of darkness…but for how long? Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

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